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State Posts 2011 Data Book Online

The Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism has released the 2011 edition of the State of Hawai‘i Data Book.   

Press release excerpts:

The state’s Data Book is the most comprehensive statistical book about Hawai’i in a single compilation. With 800 data tables, it covers a broad range of statistical information in areas such as population, education, labor, energy, business enterprises, government, tourism and transportation. 

Here’s a few factoids in the Data Book:

• Hawaii’s resident population is expected to increase by about 0.8 percent annually between 2010 and 2015, growing from about 1.36 million people in 2010 to about 1.42 million people in 2015. (Table 1.27) 

• As of September 30, 2011, there were 42,371 active-duty U.S. Department of Defense personnel stationed in Hawaii. This excludes the U.S. Coast Guard, which is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and personnel afloat or temporarily shore-based, but includes personnel deployed for Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, and New Dawn. By branch of service, there were 22,895 Army, 8,630 Navy, 5,905 Marine Corps and 4,941 Air Force personnel. (Table 10.03) 

•  In 2011, 21.5 percent of the employed wage and salary workers in Hawaii were members of unions, while 22.5 percent were represented by unions. This is considerably higher than the United States as a whole, where members made up 11.8 percent of the employed and those represented made up 13 percent. The Hawaii figures were down from 2010, when there were 21.8 percent and 23.5 percent in the state. (Table 12.47) 

In 2011, the number of registered vehicles in the State of Hawaii surpassed the 1.2 million mark, hitting a new high of 1,210,310 and beating the record high from 2007 of 1,167,240. (Table 18.06) 

• The average electricity price for residential customers on Oahu increased from 25 cents per kWh in 2010 to 32 cents per kWh in 2011, with a 25.8 percent increase from the previous year. (Table 17.13) 

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